How to Care for a Neighbor in Need

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How to Care for a Neighbor in Need

In a time of pandemic uncertainties, which compound on top of hundreds of other potential hardships, it’s natural for people around you to struggle. One such setting where you’ll see this is your neighborhood. If you want to help, read on about how to care for a neighbor in need.

Check on Them

Often, the simplest gesture is the most meaningful. Keeping tabs on how neighbors are doing is one of these steps, and it helps open doors to more specific means of helping. Though physical distance is key during the coronavirus pandemic, find ways to check in on your neighbors by saying a few words when you see them outside, knocking on their door, or sending a letter.

When people face unknowns—poor health, anxiety, financial troubles—they pull back from people they know, choosing to isolate themselves instead. Though it’s uncomfortable at times, break down these barriers and show your desire to be present for your neighbor, however they want that to look. Look for signs of distress without prying. For example, seeing the ambulance visit the home of an elderly couple next door gives you a window to express your care and concern for that neighbor.

Send Them a Care Package

Once you understand their needs, or even if you don’t, sending some kind of care package is a great way to care for your neighbor in need. Sending food fits if they’re at the end of their rope due to illness or job stress. If they’re an essential worker during this pandemic, they may appreciate a safely prepared, healthy dish so that they don’t have to cook.

If you’re grasping for straws trying to think what you should include in a care package, simply consider how you can bring a smile to their face. Use your knowledge of your neighbors to surprise them with a gift that fits an interest. Overall, though, they’ll treasure the thought, regardless of what’s inside.

Commit to Random Kindness

Another form a gift can take is a random act of kindness, especially one that meets their current struggle. Mow a lawn or weed a garden for a family grieving the loss of a family member. Plow the driveway for parents dealing with chronically misbehaving kids. Fix a mailbox for a neighbor who fears going outside. You don’t need to know the reason someone’s struggling to help—just commit to these acts of kindness to encourage them.

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